EDWARD EBERLE

SELECTED VESSELS

SELECTED SCULPTURES

Edward Eberle, photo courtesy of the Smithsonian American Art Museum

ABOUT

(B.1944, Tarentum, PA, lives and works in Pittsburgh, PA)

Edward Eberle has garnered wide recognition for work that combines narrative and geometric drawing with altered porcelain vessels. His wheel-thrown pieces are often covered with intricately detailed terra sigillata decoration or unadorned and assembled into figural, white porcelain sculptures that combine story with modified form.

Eberle has exhibited widely over the course of his career, including two one-man exhibitions at the Carnegie Museum of Art (1980, 1991) and one exhibition at the Columbus Museum of Art (1999). His work can be found in numerous private and public collections including the Carnegie Museum of Art (Pittsburgh, PA), Everson Museum (Syracuse, NY), Gardiner Museum (Toronto, ON), Los Angeles County Museum of Art (Los Angeles, CA), Museum of Fine Arts (Boston, MA), National Gallery of Australia, (Canberra, Australia), Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art (Kansas City, MO), Newark Museum of Art, (Newark, NJ), Philadelphia Museum of Art, (Philadelphia, PA), Racine Art Museum (Racine, WI), and Smithsonian American Art Museum (Washington, D.C.).

Eberle received his BFA (1967) from Edinboro State College (Edinboro, PA) and MFA (1972) from Alfred University (Alfred, NY). He taught at the Philadelphia College of Art and at Carnegie-Mellon University (Philadelphia, PA) for a total of fourteen years. Eberle has established his practice in Pittsburgh, PA since 1985, with studios in Millvale (1985-2010) and Homestead (2012-present).

MORE ON EDWARD EBERLE

CURRENT + RECENT EXHIBITIONS

SELECT PAST EXHIBITIONS

EDWARD EBERLE: In Retrospect

This catalog was published by the Society for Contemporary Craft in support of Eberle’s 2016–2017 exhibits at:
Society for Contemporary Craft, Pittsburgh, PS
The Clay Studio, Philadelphia, PA
Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, Houston, TX

“The stories Eberle weaves may not necessarily correlate directly to his own experience, rather, draw upon universal mythologies and human psycho-dramas. The artist creates a humanitarian stage, unapologetically conveying involvement and detachment, self-expression and transcendence, stoicism and altruism.” — Peter Held