Project Type: AT MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES

CRISTINA CÓRDOVA: EVA XV

CRISTINA CÓRDOVA: EVA XV

EVA XV
2022

unglazed: finished with burnished earth pigments from the island of Puerto Rico mixed with casein, lime, and oxides
60 x 18 x 22″

EVA XV

RECENTLY ON VIEW

Cristina Córdova, “EVA XV”, on view in the Spanish Colonial Gallery at the Figge Art Museum, Davenport, Iowa, 2024

2024 | Installation at the Figge Art Museum, Spanish Colonial Gallery
Davenport, IA

On view through 2024

Ferrin Contemporary “Our America/Whose America?” Anteroom Stair hall Installation at the Wickham House, Richmond, VA, 2024

OUR AMERICA/WHOSE AMERICA?

2024 | Group Exhibition in the Wickham House at the Valentine Museum | Richmond, VA

February 20, 2024 – April 21, 2024

Our America/Whose America? is a “call and response” exhibition between contemporary artists and historic ceramic objects.

View the exhibition page HERE

Ferrin Contemporary, "Are We There Yet?", 2023, Exhibition Installation View with work by Chris Antemann, Cristina Córdova, Sergei Isupov, Crystal Morey, & Kurt Weiser, Photo by John Polak Photography

Ferrin Contemporary, “Are We There Yet?”, 2023, Exhibition Installation View with work by Chris Antemann, Cristina Córdova, Sergei Isupov, Crystal Morey, & Kurt Weiser, Photo by John Polak Photography

ARE WE THERE YET?

2024 | Group Exhibition at Ferrin Contemporary | North Adams, MA

July 15 – September 2, 2023

ARE WE THERE YET? is a celebration of Ferrin Contemporary’s 40+ years as leaders in the field of modern and contemporary ceramics. What began in 1979 as a woman-owned cooperative studio and gallery in Northampton, MA has flourished across the years and the locations to become the international ceramic experts and material champions known as Ferrin Contemporary.

View the exhibition page HERE

Cristina Córdova, “EVA XV”, 2022, Installation in Figuring Space, at The Clay Studio, Philadelphia, PA

FIGURING SPACE

2024 | Group Exhibition at The Clay Studio | Philadelphia, PA

January 12 – April 16, 2023

The group of powerful, full-scale representations of human figures will serve as a body of evidence to lay bare the issues that permeate American art and social culture. Each of the artists chosen uses the figure to usurp the painful history of bodies on display in American history. They assert their autonomy and subjectivity by presenting cultural critiques through lenses of their own choosing: race, gender, class, and anti-war ideas. Roberto Lugo, Kensuke Yamada, Cristina Córdova, Chris Rodgers, Sergei Isupov, Christina West, Tip Toland, Jonathan Christensen Caballero, George Rodriguez, Roxanne Swentzell, and Kyungmin Park are among the invited artists.

ABOUT “EVA XV”


More on Cristina Córdova HERE

I have been sculpting my daughter since she was 9. This 15 year old version of Eva is unglazed and finished with burnished earth pigments from the island of Puerto Rico mixed with casein, lime, and oxides. They came specifically from two areas, one in Fajardo near the coast, where the rainforest is, and one from Orocovis in the mountainous center. Written on her back are the words “de monte y mar” ( “from mountain and sea” ) in gold, a phrase from the song Verde luz by El Topo (Antonio Cabal Vale), which became a symbol of national Puerto Rican pride and an anti-colonialist anthem.

In my practice, the image of Eva is the embodiment of change and possibility. It speaks to the inevitability of transience and the inherited threads of code that perpetuate both genes and identity. This piece seeks to perform both as a symbol and a relic by holding in its materiality a part of the Island that has thematically bound this whole series through the years, exploring the riches and vulnerabilities of this small Caribbean nation that is my home.

CLAYSCAPES

CLAYSCAPES

Clayscapes

At the Everson Museum of Art

Syracuse, NY

April 13 through October 20, 2024

Featuring:
Cristina Córdova
Paul Scott
Steven Young Lee

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION


When he was in college in the 1970s, Syracuse artist and entrepreneur Don Seymour named a series of ceramic landscape sculptures Clayscapes. This hybrid word, with roots in the earth and the ceramic community that is built around shaping it, felt so powerful that when he founded his ceramic supply business in 2003, he named it Clayscapes. A year later, a studio was added, and in 2010, a gallery.

In Central New York, clay is literally a part of the landscape. The ample deposits of clay beneath our feet were formed over many millennia by the weathering of minerals, including the pink granite from the shores of Lake Ontario that comprises a substantial part of the Everson’s building. These resources made it possible for Indigenous Onondaga potters to make some of the most distinctive wares of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy. As the area became colonized by Europeans, potters produced durable crockery for food and alcohol storage, as well as massive amounts of brick and tile. In 1841, W. H. Farrar started a small pottery business, becoming the Onondaga Pottery Company in 1871, and later evolving into Syracuse China, which was at one point the largest manufacturer of porcelain dinnerware in the United States.

Clayscapes is a tribute to clay’s ubiquitous presence in our lives, and to the powerful metaphorical and spiritual role that it can play. The Everson’s famous collection of ceramics is filled with works that explore the landscape—from artist Robert Arneson’s monumental celebration of California’s mountainous landscape to Uruguayan-born Lidya Buzio’s earthy vessels adorned with the skyline of her adopted home in New York City. The collection contains many commercially produced souvenir plates and pitchers meant to commemorate and memorialize specific places. These wares are a distinctive part of the Museum’s collection, and they provide inspiration for contemporary artists such as Paul Scott, who makes commemorative plates that reflect the ways that humans have altered the landscape and exploited its resources.

As artists continue to shape clay, Clayscapes recognizes the ways in which clay shapes us. The Everson’s ceramic collection is filled with work that documents the joys and sorrows of humankind’s relationship with the Earth. This exhibition pays tribute to the powerful connection between artists and the world around them.

Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison Street
Syracuse, NY 13202

More on the Exhibition HERE

if you should forget me for a while

if you should forget me for a while

JUNE 27 through AUGUST 25, 2024

Featuring work by Jacqueline Bishop, Melanie Bilenker, Venetia Dale, & Lauren Kalman

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION


INSTALLATION IMAGES

Sienna Patti Contemporary’s summer exhibition features the work of four female artists whose work is deeply personal yet universally relatable. How will we be remembered? Will the memories be truthful? What role do we play in shaping that truth?

Melanie Bilenker‘s detailed work starts with the artist photographing herself at home and then painstakingly rendering it using her hair as the line. Hairwork, an intimate art form, was commonly used to commemorate a loved one, especially during Victorian times. Bilenker gives it a modern twist, immortalizing herself, or at least the impression of herself—a hand lightly touching a mirror. The artist is there, just out of sight. She has made lasting a single short moment. 

Jacqueline Bishop, whose interdisciplinary practice is research-based, is acutely aware of being both an insider and an outsider, having lived longer outside her birthplace of Jamaica than on the island itself. This perspective allows her to view an environment from a distance. Bishop’s series of porcelain plates, Fauna, are showcased in this exhibition alongside a tea set titled The Keeper of All The Secrets, featuring the well-known Caribbean image of the Market Woman. Through collage and porcelain, Bishop weaves together histories of the British Empire, Colonialism, and the Transatlantic Slave Trade.

Venetia Dale also draws from history, collecting recent and antique unfinished embroideries and piecing them together to create tapestries that tell a new story. By stitching together unfinished moments of care and attention, the final embroideries link the labor of these anonymous creators at their points of pause. “I am a mother and the keeper of time in my family,” writes Venetia Dale. “By making space in my work to celebrate a pause or a fleeting gesture of care, these sculptural works become a monument to my labor as well as to the labor of those who came before me.”

In Lauren Kalman‘s recent series To Hold, plaster castings of the artist’s body are made and imprinted onto a blown glass vessel. With multiple assistants manipulating body parts, the plaster castings function like puppets, acting as a proxy for the body pressed against the molten glass. The carefully controlled form of the blown glass vessel is lost with the imprint of the body, leaving both a permanent distortion of the original form and a lasting imprint of the absent body. The To Have and To Hold series is made of wheel-thrown ceramic vessels distorted by holding them against the artist’s actual body – no casting needed. The imprint implies she was once there, the heavy vessel cradled in her arms.

FEATURED ARTWORK


Jacqueline Bishop
Fauna (Edition of 3)
2024
digital print on porcelain, gold lustre
various dimensions

Jacqueline Bishop
The Keeper of All The Secrets (Edition of 3)
2024
digital print on porcelain, gold lustre
12.5″

PAUL SCOTT at the Albany International Airport Gallery

PAUL SCOTT at the Albany International Airport Gallery

May 10 – December 31, 2024

ALBANY INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT GALLERY

737 Albany Shaker Road
Albany, NY 12211

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION & PROGRAMMING


CONFECTED, BORROWED & BLUE: Transferware by Paul Scott

Concourse A Gallery is located post-security in the main terminal’s Concourse A. It consists of five walls featuring curated exhibitions of regional artists that change twice yearly. A selection of Paul Scott’s New American Scenery series is now on display in conjunction with his solo exhibition, CONFECTED, BORROWED & BLUE at Shelburne Museum in Shelburne, VT.

English, b. 1953, Darley Dale, Derbyshire, England
lives and works in Cumbria, UK

Paul Scott is a Cumbrian-based artist with a diverse practice and an international reputation. Creating individual pieces that blur the boundaries between fine art, craft and design, he is well known for research into printed vitreous surfaces, as well as his characteristic blue and white artworks in glazed ceramic.

Scott’s artworks can be found in public collections around the globe – including The National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design Norway, the Victoria and Albert Museum London, National Museums Liverpool, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh and Brooklyn Art Museum USA. Commissioned work can be found in a number of UK museums as well as public places in the North of England, including Carlisle, Maryport, Gateshead and Newcastle Upon Tyne. He has also completed large-scale works in Hanoi, Vietnam and Guldagergård public sculpture park in Denmark.

A combination of rigorous research, studio practice, curation, writing and commissioned work ensures that his work is continually developing. It is fundamentally concerned with the re-animation of familiar objects, landscape, pattern and a sense of place. He was Professor of Ceramics at Oslo National Academy of the Arts (KHiO) from 2011–2018. Scott received his Bachelors of Art Education and Design at Saint Martin’s College and Ph.d at the Manchester Institute for Research and Innovation in Art and Design in Manchester, England.

His current research project New American Scenery has been enabled by an Alturas Foundation artist award, Ferrin Contemporary, and funding from Arts Council England. More on New American Scenery, here.

ABOUT THE ALBANY INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT GALLERY


The Albany International Airport Gallery is located on the third floor of the main terminal, and is fully accessible and open to the public daily. It hosts curated exhibitions featuring regional artists and museum collections that change twice yearly.

ALBANY INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT GALLERY

737 Albany Shaker Road
Albany, NY 12211

INQUIRE


Additional works may be available to acquire, but not listed here.

If interested in lists of all works and series: Send us a message

CONFECTED, BORROWED & BLUE

CONFECTED, BORROWED & BLUE

MAY 11 – OCT 20, 2024

SHELBURNE MUSEUM

6000 Shelburne Road
PO Box 10
Shelburne, VT 05482

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION & PROGRAMMING


CONFECTED, BORROWED & BLUE: Transferware by Paul Scott

The first in a series of “interventions” by contemporary artists features works by British artist Paul Scott, known for his provocative reinterpretation of 19th-century transferware. Plates, platters, and jugs by Scott will be displayed alongside objects from the Museum’s collection creating “segues” that spark dialogue between the old and new.

EVENTS


Important Dates:
May 11, 2024 – Opening
Oct. 20, 2024 – Closing


Opening Reception:
June 7, 2024 | 3pm
Free and open to the public


Public Artist Talk:

Friday, June 7th, 2024 | 3pm
Auditorium, Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education
Free with Museum Admission

Join us as artist, author, curator, and gardener Paul Scott discusses his artistic practice, which includes provocative reinterpretations of 19th-century transferware. Scott will pay special attention to the work he produced for the 2024 Shelburne Museum exhibition Confected, Borrowed & Blue: Transferware by Paul Scott. This show is the first in a planned series of “interventions,” in which contemporary artists respond to Shelburne Museum’s outstanding collections. Plates, platters, and jugs created by Scott—including a special commission exploring the role of the sugar industry in the Museum’s founding—are displayed alongside historical ceramics in the Variety Unit, sparking dialogue between past and present.

Talk will last approximately 45 to 60 minutes, followed by an audience Q & A. The Museum will remain open until 7:30 p.m., allowing attendees time to visit the exhibition after the talk.

LINK TO LEARN MORE

 


Study Day with American Ceramics Circle:

June 7, 2024 | 10 – 5pm
Fees: $50 for members; $60 for guests
(admission and lunch are included)
Limited to 20

Join the American Ceramics Circle for a day of private, curator-led tours and programs at Shelburne Museum, Shelburne, Vermont to explore the ceramic collections and a private tour of “Confected, Borrowed & Blue: Transferware” with the artist Paul Scott.

Click HERE to learn more

Click HERE to register

PRESS


Paul Scott’s Provocative Ceramics Reinvent Transferware Traditions

Seven Days | June 19, 2024
Article by Pamela Polston 

A recently opened exhibition at Shelburne Museum, titled “Confected, Borrowed & Blue,” presents a selection of the internationally known British artist’s transferware updated for modern times.

VIEW ARTICLE

English, b. 1953, Darley Dale, Derbyshire, England
lives and works in Cumbria, UK

Paul Scott is a Cumbrian-based artist with a diverse practice and an international reputation. Creating individual pieces that blur the boundaries between fine art, craft and design, he is well known for research into printed vitreous surfaces, as well as his characteristic blue and white artworks in glazed ceramic.

Scott’s artworks can be found in public collections around the globe – including The National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design Norway, the Victoria and Albert Museum London, National Museums Liverpool, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh and Brooklyn Art Museum USA. Commissioned work can be found in a number of UK museums as well as public places in the North of England, including Carlisle, Maryport, Gateshead and Newcastle Upon Tyne. He has also completed large-scale works in Hanoi, Vietnam and Guldagergård public sculpture park in Denmark.

A combination of rigorous research, studio practice, curation, writing and commissioned work ensures that his work is continually developing. It is fundamentally concerned with the re-animation of familiar objects, landscape, pattern and a sense of place. He was Professor of Ceramics at Oslo National Academy of the Arts (KHiO) from 2011–2018. Scott received his Bachelors of Art Education and Design at Saint Martin’s College and Ph.d at the Manchester Institute for Research and Innovation in Art and Design in Manchester, England.

His current research project New American Scenery has been enabled by an Alturas Foundation artist award, Ferrin Contemporary, and funding from Arts Council England. More on New American Scenery, here.

ABOUT THE SHELBURNE MUSEUM


Shelburne Museum is an unparalleled and unique experience of American history, art, and design. Designed to allow visitors the pleasure of discovery and exploration, the Museum includes thirty-nine distinct structures on forty-five acres, each filled with beautiful, fascinating, and whimsical objects. Come play in our gardens and open our many doors. You are welcome here.

Click to Read More HERE

SHELBURNE MUSEUM

6000 Shelburne Road
PO Box 10
Shelburne, VT 05482

INQUIRE


Additional works may be available to acquire, but not listed here.

If interested in lists of all works and series: Send us a message

RIVERS FLOW/ARTISTS CONNECT

RIVERS FLOW/ARTISTS CONNECT

In Rivers Flow / Artists Connect, American artists from the 1820s to the present day explore and illuminate our profound, symbiotic relationship with significant rivers across the globe, from the Hudson and the Susquehanna to the Indus and the Seine.

The cultural, societal, and spiritual significance of rivers is universal, as proven by their lasting presence in art and our collective imagination. In Rivers Flow / Artists Connect, American artists from the 1820s to the present day explore and illuminate our profound, symbiotic relationship with significant waterways, such as the Hudson River, the Susquehanna, and the Missouri, as well as symbolic representations.

The Hudson River Museum’s new West Wing galleries, basking in a dramatic view of the Hudson River and the Palisades, are an opportune setting for this exhibition. It features works by more than forty exceptional artists exploring various aspects of river subject matter from diverse perspectives and heritages. Together, the artists demonstrate—through painting, printmaking, photography, sculpture, and video—their role in recalling and reinforcing our instinctive connection with rivers.

The exhibition considers these bodies of water through aesthetic, functional, spiritual, and ecological lenses. The Allure of the River section addresses the interrelation of scenic beauty and our attraction to rivers. In Sustainer of Life, artists investigate the essential need for access to rivers for water, food, and transportation—our daily infrastructure—as well as profound sacred connections. Finally, Endangered Rivers: A Call to Action reflects on urbanization, industry, and the critical need for continued conservation and activism.

RIVERS FLOW/ARTISTS CONNECT


At the Hudson River Museum | Yonkers, NY | Feb 2 – Sep 1, 2024

ABOUT THE ARTISTS


In many ways, the artists and the rivers they depict are kindred spirits. Just as rivers shape the land and surmount obstacles on their inexorable journey to the sea, artists also boldly confront barriers and challenges, from land access to environmental change. Their creative expressions help us see rivers with new eyes, and perhaps even a renewed sense of wonder, connection, and purpose, as we consider our own community’s rivers and our own responsibility for stewardship.

The exhibition is co-curated by Laura Vookles, Chair of HRM’s Curatorial Department, and guest curator Jennifer McGregor.

FEATURED ARTISTS

Norman Akers • Joe Baker • James Bard • Bahar Behbahani • Karl Bodmer • Daniel Putnam Brinley • Lorenzo Clayton and Jacob Burckhardt • James & Ralph Clews • Samuel Colman • Betsy Damon • John Douglas • Joellyn Duesberry • Robert S. Duncanson • Elaine Galen • Scherezade Garcia • John Hill and William Guy Wall • Daniel Ridgeway Knight • Courtney M. Leonard • Rejin Leys • Maya Lin • Mary Fairchild Low • Ellen Kozak • John Maggiotto • James McElhinney • Frances McGuire • Alison Moritsugu • Tammy Nguyen • Don Nice • Jon Louis Nielsen • James Prosek • Winfred Rembert • Alexis Rockman • Shuli Sadé • Charlotte Schulz • Madge Scott • Paul Scott • Francis Augustus Silva • Joseph Squillante • Jerome Strauss • William Villalongo • Jason Walker • Mansheng Wang • Susan Wides • Tom Yost

b. Shinnecock, 1980
lives and works in Northfield, Minnesota

More on Courtney M. Leonard

English, b. 1953
lives and works in Cumbria, UK

More on Paul Scott

American, b.1973, Pocatello, ID
lives and works in Cedar City, UT

More on Jason Walker

PROGRAMMING


Gallery Talk with Artist Courtney M. Leonard

Sunday, June 16, 2024 | 1:30pm

Our America/Whose America?

Our America/Whose America?

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION


OUR AMERICA/WHOSE AMERICA?

Our America/Whose America? is a call and response exhibition between contemporary ceramic artists and commercially produced historic ceramic plates, figurines and objects placed in conversation with one another, installed on period furniture throughout the Wickham House at the Valentine.

Featured artists include Elizabeth Alexander, Chris Antemann, Russell Biles, Jacqueline Bishop, Judy Chartrand, Cristina Córdova, CRANK, Connor Czora, Michelle Erickson, Sergei Isupov, Steven Young Lee, Jennifer Ling Datchuk, Beth Lo, Justin Rothshank, Paul Scott, Kevin Snipes, Rae Stern, Mara Superior, Momoko Usami and Jason Walker. Historical Works include selections from Ferrin Contemporary’s collection of commercially produced ceramics.

This exhibit is organized by Ferrin Contemporary in conjunction with Coalescence, the 58th annual conference of the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts held March 20-23, 2024 in Richmond, Virginia.

  • View the historic collection HERE
  • View The Wickham House HERE
  • View The Valentine Museum HERE
  • View the 2024 Press Release HERE

EXHIBITING ARTISTS


Throughout our forty-year history, we have used multi-artist survey exhibitions as a platform to explore social issues. We’ve focused on gender and feminist perspectives, broached relationship taboos, and challenged historical notions of ceramics and art.

The contemporary artists we’ve invited use their work to assert their autonomy and subjectivity by presenting intertwined cultural critiques through lenses of their own choosing, starting with race, gender, and class. Each of these categories is tentacular and touches upon myriad other ideas including nature, warfare, food and water inequity, and more.

PROGRAMMING


Special Preview on February 21, 2024 from 5 – 7 pm

– Leslie Ferrin & Alex Jelleberg on-site Conference Preview with The Valentine

Coalescence, the 58th annual conference of the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts takes place in Richmond, Virginia.

FERRIN CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS AT NCECA


Women Working with Clay: A Shared Purpose

Mar 20, 2024 – Mar 23, 2024

Group Show with Linda Sikora

Location: The Valentine 10th and East Clay Street in historic downtown Richmond

This exhibition is organized by Dara Hartman in conjunction with Coalescence

50 Years in the Making – NCECA Richmond

Mar 20, 2024 – Mar 23, 2024

Group show with Lauren Mabry

50 Years in the Making will examine how 75 Residents since 1974 have coalesced to form the creative identity of The Clay Studio.

Event
Opening Reception
Thursday, March 21, 2024 | 7-9pm
RSVP HERE

Location: Common House | 303 W. Broad Street, Richmond, VA

EVENTS & TOUR DATES


Location for All Events:

The Valentine 10th and East Clay Street in historic downtown Richmond

Wednesday, March 20, 2024 Ferrin Contemporary + Wickham House Tour – Regular Hours

– Alex Jelleberg & Isabel Twanmo on-site with docents to provide guided tours at scheduled times 
11am, 12pm, 1pm, 2pm, 3pm, 4pm

The Valentine is open regular hours during the conference. The Wickham House offers guided tours on the hour. Tours are free to the public with museum admission (free admission on Thursday, March 21!) & free for all NCECA attendees. First come first serve, limit 15 guests per tour.

Thursday, March 21, 2024 – NCECA – MEET THE ARTISTS 5 – 7 pm 

Open to the public all NCECA attendees – Alex Jelleberg  & Isabel Twanmo

OAWA Tour Graphic April 2024

Sunday, April 21, 2024 – Final Guided Tour of Our America/Whose America? | 2-3pm

Join Ferrin Contemporary’s Leslie Ferrin & Alexandra Jelleberg on-site with Valentine Museum docents to provide a final guided tour of Our America/Whose America? in the Wickham House – Open to the public.

The Richmond Stories™ section of this site, which includes an interactive history timeline, features many of the stories that bring history to life in creative, engaging and inclusive ways.

Through educational programs that engage over 14,000 students and teachers each year to community conversations, walking tours, group visits and more, the Valentine offers compelling experiences for visitors of all ages.

The Wickham House at the Valentine Museum, Richmond, VA. Image courtesy of The Valentine Museum.

The Wickham House at the Valentine Museum, Richmond, VA. Image courtesy of The Valentine Museum.

A dialogue-based guided tour of the Wickham House, a National Historic Landmark built in 1812, challenges guests to explore aspects of life in the early 19th century. The Wickham House was purchased by Mann Valentine Jr. and in 1898 became the first home of the Valentine Museum. This historic home allows us to tell the complicated story of the Wickham family, the home’s enslaved occupants, sharing spaces, the realities of urban slavery and more.

OUR AMERICA/WHOSE AMERICA | 2022


OUR AMERICA/ WHOSE AMERICA?


AUGUST 6 – OCTOBER 30, 2022

LESLIE FERRIN
(Director & Founder) Ferrin Contemporary

Our America, Whose America presents a dialogue between contemporary artists and a collection of commercially produced ceramics. This collection of historical objects, collected across the span of several years by Founding Director Leslie Ferrin, is in the form of plates, souvenirs, and figurines from the early 19th through mid-20th centuries. The items were produced in England, Occupied Japan, and various factories in the USA. The exhibition title was chosen from a series of plates produced by Vernon Kiln that features illustrations of American scenes by the painter Rockwell Kent.

In response to this historical collection, contemporary works by nearly 30 participating artists will provide new context and interpretation of these profoundly powerful objects. Seen now, decades and in some cases centuries later, the narratives they deliver through image, characterization, and stereotype, whether overt and bombastic or subtle and cunning, form a collective memory that continues to impact the way people see themselves and others today.

Exhibition At Ferrin Contemporary


1315 MASS MoCA Way, North Adams, MA

ARTISTS & CONTRIBUTORS


Ferrin Contemporary | Exhibition | 2022

OUR AMERICA/WHOSE AMERICA? EXHIBITION CATALOG


Ferrin Contemporary | Exhibition | 2022

Exhibition and catalog production by Ferrin Contemporary staff, catalog layout by Rory Coyne with installation and artwork photography by John Polak Photography, 2022.

  • 58 Page Catalog
  •  Introduction by the Gallery
  • Featuring 23 Artists
  • Installation & Artwork Photos by John Polak Photography

Published by Ferrin Contemporary

HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES ON ILLUSTRATION AND RACE, Exhibition & Symposium at the Norman Rockwell Museum, Stockbridge, MA


HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES ON ILLUSTRATION AND RACE

Zoom Webinar (online)
Welcome and Opening Program:
Friday, September 23, 2022
7 p.m. to 8:45 p.m.

Symposium Presentations and Panels:
Saturday, September 24, 2022
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES ON ILLUSTRATION AND RACE

A series of compelling talks by Heather Campbell Coyle, Ph.D; Karen Fang, Ph.D; Michele Bogart, Ph.D.; Theresa Leininger-Miller, Ph.D.; and Leonard Davis, followed by conversation with the commentators.

SYMPOSIUM FEATURES


Hidden in Plain Sight: Illustrated Ceramics and American Identity

TIMESTAMPS

0:00 Introduction to Symposium co-curators Stephanie Plunkett and Robyn Phillips Pendleton
23:00 Introduction
28:00 Leslie Ferrin Our America/Whose America? collection and exhibition
46:00 Jacqueline Bishop
52:00 Paul Scott
1:02:00 Elizabeth Alexander
1:11:00 Johnson
1:21:00 Judy Chartrand
1:37:00 Q&A

Hidden in plain sight, illustrations on porcelain and ceramic ware have, throughout history, transformed functional objects into message-bearers for a wide range of political and propagandistic causes, whether exchanged by heads of state or acquired for use or display in domestic settings. Leslie Ferrin of Ferrin Contemporary will discuss the imagery, drawn from popular nineteenth-century prints, that was reproduced on widely distributed ceramics portraying historical events, indigenous people, and notable explorers, inventors, and politicians through a white European lens. The panel will explore how these seemingly ordinary objects, including Rockwell collector plates, have helped to establish firmly held beliefs about American identity. Artists Elizabeth Alexander, Jacqueline Bishop, Judy Chartrand, Niki Johnson, and Paul Scott, will discuss contemporary ceramics, which reject systems of racial oppression and invite reconsideration of the sanitized version of history that was presented for generations.

Historical Perspectives on Illustration and Race

View the Entire Symposium Playlist from the Norman Rockwell Museum

TIMESTAMPS

00:00 START
00:13 Welcome
04:49 Opening Remarks
22:50 Panel: Hidden in Plain Sight – Illustrated Ceramics and American Identity

These concise presentations by Imprinted: Illustrating Race catalogue authors and exhibition lenders will focus on widely-circulated historical representations of race in the press and in popular culture that established a sense of American nationalism for white audiences through the subjugation of Indigenous, Black, and Asian people and cultures.

Witness to History: Collecting Black Americana
Leonard Davis, designer and collector

PAST PROGRAMMING


Ferrin Contemporary | Exhibition | 2022

OPENING RECEPTION

Thursday, August. 11, 2022 | 5-7 pm
during Building 13 Art Walk

CLOSING RECEPTION

Special Guest Artist Paul Scott (UK)

Thursday, Nov. 3, 2022 |  5-7 pm

Closing reception of the ‘OAWA’ exhibition at Ferrin Gallery, with special guest artist Paul Scott (UK) in attendance, as well as select additional artists and the curators in the exhibition.

at Ferrin Contemporary, North Adams, MA

SYMPOSIUM

Historical Perspectives on Illustration and Race

Zoom Webinar (online)
Welcome and Opening Program:
Friday, September 23, 2022
7 p.m. to 8:45 p.m.

Symposium Presentations and Panels:
Saturday, September 24, 2022
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

PORTLAND VASE: MANIA AND MUSE

PORTLAND VASE: MANIA AND MUSE

June 9, 2024 – September 8, 2024

CROCKER ART MUSEUM

216 O Street Sacramento, CA 95814

MORE ABOUT THE EXHIBITION


& INSTALLATION IMAGES

The Portland Vase: Mania and Muse asks why and how a singular Classical vase becomes a legend, an “influencer,” and an artistic and commercial muse across time and place.

The Portland Vase, an ancient Roman glass cameo amphora, has resonated with artists, makers, collectors, and consumers for centuries. The Portland Vase: Mania and Muse asks why and how a singular Classical vase becomes a legend, an “influencer,” and an artistic and commercial muse across time and place from artists such as Josiah Wedgwood to sculptor Viola Frey. Featuring more than sixty-five artworks, this exhibition examines the role of brands in our culture, considers why Classical traditions dominate the artistic canon, and how that tradition might be reconsidered and disrupted.

Guest curated by Rachel Gotlieb, PhD.

ABOUT THE ARTISTS


American
b. 1970 Albany, NY
lives and works between Joseph, OR and Meissen, Germany

More on Chris Antemann

b. 1982 Rochester, NY,
lives and works in Penfield, NY

More on Peter Pincus

Read about the making of Thetis Confined

American, b. 1951, New York, NY
lives and works in Williamsburg, MA

More on Mara Superior

PROGRAMMING


Tour – Portland Vase: Mania and Muse
Wednesday, June 12 | 1pm
Free with museum admission

Journey into art on view with docents to guide your visit. Enjoy a drop-in tour any day the Museum is open, or plan ahead for one of the themed tours outlined below. Some tours may be requested in American Sign Language, Cantonese, French, Madarin, and Spanish with a two-week advance notice. Email education@crockerart.org to inquire.

LEARN MORE

Backstory – Portland Vase: Mania and Muse (via YouTube Live) 
Saturday, August 3rd | 12pm
$8 – $12

Go behind the scenes of the exhibition The Portland Vase: Mania and Muse with this virtual panel discussion featuring speakers across three continents. Moderated by exhibition curator Rachel Gotlieb, with artists Clare Twomey, Glenn Barkley, and Nancy Selvin, this international conversation considers how and why a singular Classical vase became an artistic and commercial muse across time and place, and how these contemporary artists are rethinking and addressing art and social histories through reinterpretations of this iconic vessel.

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ABOUT CROCKER ART MUSEUM


Discover a diverse collection of artworks that span centuries, continents, and cultures at the Crocker Art Museum, the primary resource for the study and appreciation of fine art in the Sacramento region. In addition to a robust schedule of changing exhibitions, visitors can explore California art dating from the Gold Rush to the present; a renowned collection of Master Drawings and European paintings; one of the largest international ceramics collections in the United States; and collections of Asian, African, and Oceanic art.

Engagement with art is at the heart of everything we do, and our calendar of events offers innovative art experiences for visitors of all ages, including family-friendly programs, thought-provoking talks and conversations, inspiring concerts and films, and more. 

CHRIS ANTEMANN: A Stage For Dessert

CHRIS ANTEMANN: A Stage For Dessert

INTERVENTIONS AT THE MINT MUSEUM


Mint Museum, Charlotte, NC

Interventions at Mint Museum Randolph

If you walk through the galleries at Mint Museum Randolph, the art is largely organized by region, type, or era. There are galleries for European art, African art, art of the Ancient Americas, Native American art, and decorative arts. However, within some of these galleries, there are works displayed that are “out of place” or “out of time.” Interventions seek to question the past against the present by placing contemporary artworks alongside works from other eras.

InterventionsPortals to the Past: British Ceramics 1675 – 1825

This exhibition presents over 200 examples of British ceramics. Visitors can learn about these pieces’ functions, styles, manufacturing techniques, and makers. Each region or manufacturer had a unique style and method of creating ceramics, which can be seen in the wide variety of works on display. Included in the exhibition are traditional styles like blue and white Delftware, vessels made to look like vegetables or fruits, commemorative teacups, allegorical figures, decorative figurines of animals, and many more. You can view an online version of this exhibition here.

This exhibition already invites the viewer to analyze our relationship to the past by means of its title. However, in bringing contemporary pieces to this gallery, we can find new ways of looking at a medium’s influence on our present-day society.

Antemann’s work proves that the art of ceramics is still relevant, but its function has changed. Her art focuses on how ceramics exist in the domestic lives of those who own them and what meanings are ascribed to them. Her style is based on that of 18th-century ceramics because she believes that recreating traditions allows us to find new interpretations in the present.

This meeting of past and present is clear in Antemann’s A Stage for Dessert. Numerous figures stand around at a dessert banquet in lively, lighthearted positions. However, Antemann is joking with the viewer to comment on the flirtatious, playful, or even risqué nature of the figures. What could once signify a deep meaning to a 19th-century owner, such as an allegory or a representation of a season, has been adapted into a less serious object.

Information courtesy of mint.wiko.pbworks.com

A Stage for Dessert


InterventionsPortals to the Past: British Ceramics 1675 – 1825 

Images courtesy of The Mint Museum of Art & Ferrin Contemporary

A Stage for Dessert


Previous Installation at Hillwood Estate & Gardens

An Occasion to Gather Chris Antemann’s porcelain centerpiece, is filled with 18th-century style ceramic sweets, takes inspiration from the garden sculptures and eighteenth-century design of Hillwood’s French parterre. As with the dining room table display, here Antemann references eighteenth-century dining culture and the porcelain centerpieces commonly used as table decoration by European elites.

Antemann integrates porcelain figures into her reconception of the French parterre. “I imagined what lives were like in the eighteenth century, what these figures would have been doing, what the collectors of these figures would have been doing,” she said. “My centerpiece is a seductive playground for the porcelain figure; they are not static on the base, but in the world, playing and enjoying the environment.” The tableware from Hillwood’s collection on the breakfast room table includes porcelain from a dessert service made by the Jacob Petit manufactory in France around 1835 (acc. no. 24.120), French glassware dating to the 1700s (acc. nos. 23.312–315), and porcelain and silver-gilt flatware made in Russia in the 1800s (acc. no. 25.479).

–Dr. Rebecca Tilles, associate curator of 18th-century French and Western European Fine and decorative arts, Hillwood Estate & Gardens

Images courtesy of Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens, photographed by Erik Kvalsvik

MORE ON CHRIS ANTEMANN


View More by Chris Antemann  •  HERE  •

Chris Antemann is known for work inspired by 18th-century porcelain figurines, employing a unity of design and concept to simultaneously examine and parody male and female relationship roles. Characters, themes, and incidents build upon each other, effectively forming their own language that speaks about domestic rites, social etiquette, and taboos. Themes from the classics and the romantics are given a contemporary edge; elaborate dinner parties, picnic luncheons, and ornamental gardens set the stage for her twisted tales to unfold.

Ebb/Flow: Pritika Chowdhry, Chotsani Elaine Dean and Courtney M. Leonard

Ebb/Flow: Pritika Chowdhry, Chotsani Elaine Dean and Courtney M. Leonard

The phrase “ebb and flow” is defined as a recurrent or rhythmical pattern of coming and going or decline and regrowth.  It is often used to evoke a sense of calm by suggesting that lows will be followed by highs in an endless and certain course. This usage, however, belies the fact that ebbing and flowing also describes the often fierce dynamism and unpredictability of natural and emotional reality.

Addressing the violence of separation, the practice of keeping memories and the invasive effects of colonialism, Pritika ChowdhryChotsani Elaine Dean and Courtney M. Leonard contemplate the past, the present and possible futures in their large scale, ceramic-based installation works. The individual works poetically contemplate the 1947 partition of India, the manual and psychological labor of enslaved and free African Americans and the changed environments and indigenous lifeways brought on by outside occupation and settlement.

Crossing boundaries of traditional studio ceramics, sculpture, and conceptual and political art, the Ebb/Flow multimedia installations deepen access to and interrogate sites of historical and cultural upheaval. In addition, they add to the material and subject diversity of  the Weisman’s notable ceramics and American art collections. As such, the Weisman proudly presents these works to evoke reflection on and discussion of some of the most important and resounding issues of our time.


Image credits (L to R): Courtney M. Leonard, Breach Logbook 22: Cull (detail), installation view, 2022. Ceramic, paint, and video. Weisman Art Museum commission.; Pritika Chowdhry, Silent Waters (detail), 2009. Ceramic, wax, and sound. 2015.2.1.1-2015.2.1.101; Chotsani Elaine Dean, Comptoir de commerce: saadje, navigeren, waarde, 2022. Ceramic, resin, and seeds. Lent by the artist.

Weisman Art Museum Exhibition Link  HERE

Courtney M. Leonard Artist Profile HERE

PROGRAMING


Artist Talk: “Perspectives on Water” with Courtney M. Leonard
Nov 29 2023 | 6 – 7pm

333 E River Road
MinneapolisMN 55455
United States

Additional Details

NOTICE: THIS EVENT IS BEING POSTPONED FOR ACCESSIBILITY REASONS – DUE TO A BURST PIPE, THE WEISMAN ART MUSEUM GARAGE IS TEMPORARILY CLOSED UNTIL THE AFFECTED SYSTEM CAN BE REPAIRED. In order to ensure all speakers and attendees are able to access the event with ease, the event is postponed until spring/summer 2024. We will continue to provide updates regarding this program.

In the meantime, consider spending time with a RICH, MULTIMEDIA INTERVIEW the Weisman’s Interpretation Assistant Eileen Bass conducted in September, 2023. You can also visit Courtney Leonard’s site-specific work, BREACH: Logbook 22 | Cull in the Riverview gallery, during museum open hours.

Ceramic artist Courtney M. Leonard (Shinnecocke) will discuss her work Breach Logbook 22: Cull in conversation with Ojibwe leader and activist Sharon Day, Dr. Kate Beane, Executive Director of the Minnesota Museum of American Art and adjunct faculty in American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota, and Vicente Diaz, Chair of the Department of American Indian Studies, and Director of The Native Canoe Program, at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. This conversation will be moderated by Dr. Roxanne Biidabinokwe Gould, a professor emerita of Indigenous Education and Environmental Studies at the University of Minnesota Duluth.

Leonard’s body of work examines histories of water and seeks to activate conversations about industrial impacts on water, inter-species connections, climate change, and the shifting relationships between humans and water, as informed by the past. Presented in conversation with the exhibition, Ebb/Flow, currently on view at WAM. Q&A to follow.

PRESS


In September, the Weisman Art Museum’s Interpretation Assistant, Eileen Bass, interviewed artist Courtney M. Leonard in connection with her site-specific artwork BREACH: Logbook | CULL, 2022. The resulting interview is a rich record of Leonard’s process and weaves between topics of: clay, water rights, the passage of time, and her experience as an indigenous artist in non-indigenous arts spaces. 

EILEEN BASS is currently studying at the University of Minnesota and is pursuing a double major in Anthropology and English, with a minor in Creative Writing. Her communities are the Hunkpapa Lakota of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, the Mvskoke Creek Nation of OK, and she is enrolled in the Sac & Fox Nation of OK. She is currently studying Dakota language because she lives in Minnesota. Her interests include language revitalization, museum repatriation, tribal sovereignty, and Indigenous storytelling/truth telling within the current literary climate.

Courtney M. Leonard (Shinnecock, b.1980) is an artist and filmmaker, who has contributed to the Offshore Art movement. Leonard’s current work embodies the multiple definitions of “breach”, an exploration and documentation of historical ties to water, whale and material sustainability. In collaboration with national and international museums, cultural institutions, and indigenous communities in North America, New Zealand, Nova Scotia, and the United States Embassies, Leonard’s practice investigates narratives of cultural viability as a reflection of environmental record.