Project Tag: Jacqueline Bishop

JACQUELINE BISHOP: Fauna

JACQUELINE BISHOP: Fauna

Fauna
2024
digital print on commercial porcelain, gold lustre
various dimensions

FAUNA

Tea Service | Limited Edition Set 

RECENTLY ON VIEW

Jacqueline Bishop,"Fauna (Tea Service)", 2024, digital print on porcelain, gold lustre, Tea Set with Teapot, Cup, Saucer, Cream Pitcher, Sugar Pot, Rectangular Plate, Oval Plate; Teapot: 6 x 9 x 5.5".

Jacqueline Bishop,”Fauna (Tea Service)”, 2024, digital print on porcelain, gold lustre, Tea Set with Teapot, Cup, Saucer, Cream Pitcher, Sugar Pot, Rectangular Plate, Oval Plate; Teapot: 6 x 9 x 5.5″.

if you should forget me for a while

Exhibition at Sienna Patti Contemporary
June 27 through August 25, 2024
Lenox, MA

Featuring work by Jacqueline Bishop, Melanie Bilenker, Venetia Dale, & Lauren Kalman

ABOUT “FAUNA”


More on Jacqueline Bishop HERE

Jacqueline Bishop’s interdisciplinary practice is focused on making visible the ephemeral, in speaking aloud the unspoken, in telling untold stories and voicing voicelessness. Bishop is acutely aware of what it means to be simultaneously an insider and an outsider having lived longer outside of her birthplace of Jamaica than on the island itself. This has allowed her to view a given environment from a distance.

Fauna arises out of Bishop’s long-standing questions about the position of black women in Caribbean society. Her first collection of poems published in 2006, also titled ‘Fauna’, used Caribbean flowers as metaphors to explore the lives of enslaved women. Bishop sees this new commissioned work as a visual manifestation of these poems.

Further research revealed that prior to the ending of the slave trade there was no attention given to either the maternal health of pregnant women or their babies. Where and to whom did enslaved women turn when they were trying to conceive, could not conceive or found themselves with unwanted pregnancies? The answer lay in the plants, flowers, fruits and herbs of Jamaica. Each one contained a unique botanical element that could either end an unwanted pregnancy or encourage fertility. In Fauna Bishop has surrounded the women and their children with healing and protective herbs. Indeed, in one case, the mother is offering her child up to the arms of the natural environment.

Fauna was commissioned by The Harris and will go on display when the museum re- opens in Spring 2025. Unveiling overlooked and brutal histories of slavery and colonialism, Bishop’s work is an important acquisition for The Harris’ ceramic collection. Creating dialogues with other pieces in The Harris’ collection, most importantly an oil painting recently identified as ‘A Jamaica Landscape’ (c. 1774), attributed to George Robertson, Bishop said that her work “intervenes in the idyllic presentation of slavery and enslavement of the painting to present enslaved women using the environment to shield themselves and their children. Both works speak to each other.” Both works will be displayed together as this timely acquisition will play an integral part in a new display exploring the global history of tea, weaving together histories of British Empire, Colonialism and the Transatlantic Slave Trade.

Jacqueline Bishop (b. 1971, Kingston, Jamaica) lives and works in New York and Miami, Florida. Bishop worked with Emma Price; a British ceramicist based in Stoke- on-Trent in the former Spode factories in the realisation of this new work.

Recent exhibition solo exhibitions include British Art Studies, Paul Mellon Center, London (2022); SRO Gallery, Brooklyn, New York (2018); Meyerhoff Gallery, Baltimore, Maryland (2016). Recent group exhibitions include The Valentine Museum, Richmond, Virginia (2024); Gardiner Museum, Toronto, Ontario, CA (2024); Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge (2023); Ferrin Contemporary, North Adams, MA (2022); British Ceramics Biennial (2021); Stoke-on-Trent (2021) and Jamaica Biennial, National Gallery of Jamaica. Kingston (2017).

NEWS

New Acquisition: Fauna by Jacqueline Bishop

The Harris is thrilled to announce a new acquisition to our collection, presented by the Contemporary Art Society

Jacqueline Bishop’s interdisciplinary masterpiece, ‘Fauna’, sheds light on overlooked narratives of enslaved women in Caribbean society. Commissioned by The Harris, this evocative ceramic work intertwines botanical elements with maternal themes, unveiling poignant stories of resilience. Displaying alongside historical pieces, ‘Fauna’ sparks dialogues on the global history of tea and colonialism. Don’t miss its unveiling in Spring 2025!

READ MORE HERE

Jacqueline Bishop, “Fauna”, 2024, digital print on porcelain, gold lustre, Simon Critchley Photography

if you should forget me for a while

if you should forget me for a while

JUNE 27 through AUGUST 25, 2024

Featuring work by Jacqueline Bishop, Melanie Bilenker, Venetia Dale, & Lauren Kalman

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION


INSTALLATION IMAGES

Sienna Patti Contemporary’s summer exhibition features the work of four female artists whose work is deeply personal yet universally relatable. How will we be remembered? Will the memories be truthful? What role do we play in shaping that truth?

Melanie Bilenker‘s detailed work starts with the artist photographing herself at home and then painstakingly rendering it using her hair as the line. Hairwork, an intimate art form, was commonly used to commemorate a loved one, especially during Victorian times. Bilenker gives it a modern twist, immortalizing herself, or at least the impression of herself—a hand lightly touching a mirror. The artist is there, just out of sight. She has made lasting a single short moment. 

Jacqueline Bishop, whose interdisciplinary practice is research-based, is acutely aware of being both an insider and an outsider, having lived longer outside her birthplace of Jamaica than on the island itself. This perspective allows her to view an environment from a distance. Bishop’s series of porcelain plates, Fauna, are showcased in this exhibition alongside a tea set titled The Keeper of All The Secrets, featuring the well-known Caribbean image of the Market Woman. Through collage and porcelain, Bishop weaves together histories of the British Empire, Colonialism, and the Transatlantic Slave Trade.

Venetia Dale also draws from history, collecting recent and antique unfinished embroideries and piecing them together to create tapestries that tell a new story. By stitching together unfinished moments of care and attention, the final embroideries link the labor of these anonymous creators at their points of pause. “I am a mother and the keeper of time in my family,” writes Venetia Dale. “By making space in my work to celebrate a pause or a fleeting gesture of care, these sculptural works become a monument to my labor as well as to the labor of those who came before me.”

In Lauren Kalman‘s recent series To Hold, plaster castings of the artist’s body are made and imprinted onto a blown glass vessel. With multiple assistants manipulating body parts, the plaster castings function like puppets, acting as a proxy for the body pressed against the molten glass. The carefully controlled form of the blown glass vessel is lost with the imprint of the body, leaving both a permanent distortion of the original form and a lasting imprint of the absent body. The To Have and To Hold series is made of wheel-thrown ceramic vessels distorted by holding them against the artist’s actual body – no casting needed. The imprint implies she was once there, the heavy vessel cradled in her arms.

FEATURED ARTWORK


Jacqueline Bishop
Fauna (Edition of 3)
2024
digital print on porcelain, gold lustre
various dimensions

Jacqueline Bishop
The Keeper of All The Secrets (Edition of 3)
2024
digital print on porcelain, gold lustre
12.5″

JACQUELINE BISHOP: The Narratives of Migration

JACQUELINE BISHOP: The Narratives of Migration

The Narratives of Migration
edition of 3
2024
digital print on commercial porcelain, gold lustre
11 x 11 x .5

NARRATIVES OF MIGRATION

Limited Edition Set | Edition of 3

ABOUT “THE NARRATIVES OF MIGRATION”


More on Jacqueline Bishop HERE

The series of plates derives its title from a poem I wrote which traces various migrations within my family. As a child growing up on the island of Jamaica, I never knew my mother’s father, but I knew that he lived in England where he had another family. My mother and her brother– his children– were left back on the island of Jamaica. 

Jamaica’s relationship with England began in 1655 when, having failed to wrest Cuba from Spain, the English settled on Jamaica as a secondary prize. While I grew up in an independent country (achieved from England in 1962) England still loomed large in my consciousness as a child born in the 1970s. Even today, the British Monarch remains Head of State of Jamaica, which is part of the Commonwealth. 

In this work, it is both my family’s history and a larger English/Jamaican history that I have sought to trace. These plates consist of family photographs of my grandmother, my mother, and my mother’s brother in Jamaica, and my grandfather, his wife, and my aunts in England. They reference the recent Windrush scandal whereby British citizens from the Caribbean living in the UK for decades were being deported back to the Caribbean, and they tell a longer story of enslavement. Replete are images of the flora and fauna of the Caribbean which would be taken from the island to fill English gardens and give rise to the field of Natural history. Also included are the icons of nationalism developed for Jamaica by the British. 

What these plates show is that in both personal and political terms, the relationship between Jamaica and the UK is one that is enduring.  

-Jacqueline Bishop

NEWS

2024 INTERNATIONAL CERAMIC ART FAIR (ICAF)

2024 INTERNATIONAL CERAMIC ART FAIR (ICAF)

MAY 23, 2024 – JUNE 2, 2024

At the Gardiner Museum
Toronto, Ontario

ABOUT THE 2024 INTERNATIONAL CERAMIC ART FAIR


& Symposium

The International Ceramic Art Fair (ICAF) is a 10-day celebration of some of the most compelling recent ceramic art, featuring works by emerging and established artists from a wide range of backgrounds, as well as online and in-person programming by artists and curators.

ICAF 2024 focuses on the theme of gathering to explore ways in which artworks, and clay as a medium, can bring us together to create common ground. Amid political, religious, ethnic, class, and cultural divides, gathering enables us to focus on how we are united in our humanity, highlighting shared experiences and needs. Gathering encourages listening, as we share space within the action of coming together. To gather is also to collect our resources, both internal and external, for healing and survival. We gather with emotional and spiritual intention, honouring our full capacities as beings to face the challenges and opportunities we encounter. ICAF 2024 highlights Canadian and international artists who engage clay as a medium for coming together to reassert our shared bonds with each other and the earth.

PROGRAMMING


PREVIEW GALA

Wednesday May 22, 7 – 10 pm

Be among the first to view and purchase exceptional ceramic works from leading galleries and artists at the International Ceramics Art Fair’s exclusive Preview Gala. Proceeds from this fundraising event support the Gardiner Museum’s Community Access Fund, making clay programs more widely available to communities with limited access to arts education.

Dress: Cocktail attire

If you require any accommodations to ensure your participation, please inform us in advance.
*Charitable tax receipt issued post-event for the maximum allowable amount.

Single ticket: $250
Package of 10: $2,000
Young Patron Circle: $200
By Phone: 416.408.5051

 

LESLIE FERRIN: MEET ME AT International Ceramic Art Fair at the Gardiner Museum, Toronto

Thursday May 23rd | 1:30-2:30pm
Gardiner Museum
111 Queens Park Toronto, ON M5S 2C7 Canada

Ferrin Contemporary invites you to join Leslie Ferrin for an in person tour of ICAF the International Ceramic Art Fair hosted by the Gardiner Museum in Toronto! The 4th annual fair is a 10-day celebration of contemporary ceramic art that features works by emerging and established artists from a wide range of backgrounds. In addition to Ferrin Contemporary, five international galleries and selected independent artists present recent works in the museum galleries exploring this year’s theme Gathering.

On May 23, the in-person event with Leslie Ferrin is a great opportunity to learn about the work of three gallery artists, Jacqueline Bishop, Peter Pincus and Linda Sikora with gallery director, Leslie Ferrin. 

RSVP HERE
The first five people who RSVP and all members of the museum will be given complimentary admission.

JACQUELINE BISHOP IN CONVERSATION WITH RONALD CUMMINGS

Saturday, May 29, 2024, 6 – 8pm

 

Join ICAF for a conversation between Jacqueline Bishop, featured artist at the International Ceramic Art Fair (ICAF), and Ronald Cummings, associate professor in the Faculty of Humanities’ Department of English and Cultural Studies at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. Jacqueline is represented by Ferrin Contemporary in Massachusetts.

This discussion will examine Bishop’s most recent work, Narratives of Migration, which traces family histories of migration and in particular, migration journeys between Jamaica and England. These family portraits and narratives become one way of mapping a history of colonial relations and genealogical entanglements. According to Bishop “it is both my family’s history and a larger English/Jamaican history that I have sought to trace.” Images of family in Narratives of Migration are also layered with flora and fauna “taken from the island to fill English gardens and give rise to the field of Natural history.”

The conversation will also explore Bishop’s ongoing attention to Caribbean lives and landscapes across her visual work, including her plates and porcelain tea services: The Market Woman’s StoryHistory at the Dinner TableThe Keeper of All The Secrets, and Fauna.

FREE with registration

REGISTER HERE 

ARTIST TOUR & POTTERY DEMONSTRATION WITH LINDA SIKORA

Saturday, May 25, 2024, 9:30am – 12:30pm

 

Featured artist Linda Sikora will lead a tour of her work in the International Ceramic Art Fair (ICAF), followed by an exclusive studio demonstration. Lind a is represented by Ferrin Contemporary in Massachusetts.

Experience firsthand the artist’s unique way of transforming her intuitively and spontaneously made pressed forms into three-dimensional sculptures. Linda will demonstrate both wheel throwing and the making of a pitcher pot referencing early medieval pottery. She will offer insight into her methods of constructing, loading, firing, glazing, and installation, as well as her artistic philosophy. Don’t miss this unique opportunity to learn from one of the most thoughtful and articulate makers in the field of contemporary ceramics.

$45 General | $38 Gardiner Members | $38 Students with valid Student ID

 

PURCHASE TICKETS HERE

CERAMIC CRITIQUE WITH LINDA SIKORA

Saturday, May 25, 2024, 2 – 4:30pm

 

Bring your ceramic work to the Gardiner Museum for a professional critique with featured artist Linda Sikora. Linda is a Professor of Ceramic Art at the New York State College of Ceramics, Alfred University. 

Participants are invited to bring 1-2 pieces of work in progress for the artist’s feedback. Critique will be offered on an individual or group basis depending on the number of participants and the similarity of works. This is an invaluable opportunity to receive guidance from a leading ceramic artist and professor.

$30 General | $25.50 Gardiner Members | $22 Students with valid Student ID

 

PURCHASE TICKETS HERE

JACQUELINE BISHOP: Keeper of All The Secrets

JACQUELINE BISHOP: Keeper of All The Secrets

Keeper of All The Secrets (Tea Service)
edition of 3
2023
digital print on commercial porcelain
various dimensions

KEEPER OF ALL THE SECRETS (TEA SERVICE)

Limited Edition Set | Edition of 3

KEEPER OF ALL THE SECRETS (TEXTILE)

ABOUT


More on Jacqueline Bishop HERE

Because of her knowledge of the properties of the plants and flowers on the island(s) of the Caribbean and her ability to move about the island going to and from market, among the duties the market woman had to take on was the ability to regulate women’s menstrual cycles. Consequently, if a woman missed her cycle and feared that she had an unwanted pregnancy, she would seek out a market woman to purchase the necessary plants to bring on a reluctant period. But the market woman had to be secretive in what she was doing for during the period of slavery, the children that enslaved women had in their very bodies did not belong to them. Rather they belonged to the people who owned them, and it was punishable by death for enslaved women to seek to destroy their owner’s property i.e., unborn slave children. Abortion remains contested to this day as the recent Supreme Court ruling in the United States demonstrates and even on the island of Jamaica abortion remains illegal. Consequently, trafficking in plants that could aid in abortion was illegal for both the market woman and the woman seeking to end an unwanted pregnancy. In this way the market woman became the “The Keeper of All the Secrets”: She had to be secretive enough to protect herself as well as the girls and women she was helping.

-Jacqueline Bishop

ON “KEEPER OF ALL THE SECRETS”

What I have done in this body of work is trace this history of the market woman’s use of abortifacients from the period of slavery until today in a tea set. If a viewer looks closely at the imagery on the tea set, they will see that I have placed my work in conversation with the earliest paintings that were done of Jamaica which shows the market woman as a figure with a basket on her head, or on the dusty streets of Kingston, her child at her side, sitting and selling. One of the most meaningful images for me is a meeting between a market woman and an indigenous woman demonstrating an exchange of botanical and other information and knowledge between both women. Not only is that image recreated on one of the largest pieces in the tea set, but I have had the piece created on West Indian Sea Island Cotton, one of the most refined cottons in the world to reinforce the themes of the work. The indigenous Taino of the island of Jamaica were master cotton weavers, a skill passed on to the enslaved; as well the cotton flower was an important abortifacient, and this is perhaps knowledge passed on by indigenous women to enslaved women. Intertwined on the tea set with the market women are various abortifacient plants along with sugar used to make the drink that would engender the abortions, but sugar also being an integral part of the history of enslavement. All of this is showcased in a tea set outlined in gold making the point that enslavement, colonialism, slavery gave rise to luxury commodities enjoyed and enjoined in Europe as is this porcelain tea set.

-Jacqueline Bishop

NEWS

Jacqueline Bishop: History at the Dinner Table

Jacqueline Bishop: History at the Dinner Table

History at the Dinner Table
2021
digital print on commercial porcelain
11″ diameter each

HISTORY AT THE DINNER TABLE

Limited Edition Set

RECENTLY ON VIEW

Black Atlantic: Power, People, Resistance


At the Fitzwilliam Museum | Cambridge, UK | September 8 – January 7, 2024

ABOUT History at the Dinner Table


More on Jacqueline Bishop HERE

More on Emma Price HERE

This work was produced with help by Emma Price, a potter based in the UK. Jacqueline Bishop begins the process by designing collages of images she sources of the Market Women. From these collages, decals are produced, and Jacqueline decides which porcelain objects on which to apply the decals. Emma then brings these two ideas together by firing the decals onto the porcelain in a kiln.

“We test various colors and whether they work with the decals on the porcelain before we finally settle on something. It is all quite involved. Emma and I have been working together for quite some time now so we have a bit of a routine.”

STATEMENT


As a little girl growing up on the island of Jamaica, Jacqueline Bishop’s grandmother had a large mahogany cabinet where she kept some of her most prized possessions: her bone china crockery. These delicate pieces were painted with bright, cheerful images of palaces and carriages and were only used on special occasions.

As beautiful as these china dishes were, they often hid a violent history of slavery and colonialism by European countries. In ‘History at the Dinner Table’, Jacqueline changes the story by showing the legacy of slavery on the dishes instead. Despite their violent history, Bishop is also seduced and charmed by the delicacy and beauty of bone chinaware and she has sought to produce dishes equally as beautiful as the ones made by major European centers of bone china production. The work is often exhibited in mahogany cabinets as mahogany was once a major luxury import from Jamaica to England.

NEWS

The Fitzwilliam Museum Brings Together Global Stories and Histories of Exploitation, Resilience and Liberation

September 2, 2023 | Published by Widewalls

Titled Black Atlantic: Power, People, Resistance, the exhibition will feature global stories and histories of exploitation, resilience, and liberation. It will include historical, modern, and contemporary pieces by Black artists, among whom are Donald Locke, Barbara Walker, Keith Piper, Alberta Whittle, and Jacqueline Bishop. Geographically, it will span West Africa, the Caribbean, South America, and Europe.

READ MORE HERE

Black Atlantic: Power, People, Resistance

August 31, 2023 | Published by Apollo

The Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge brings together artworks and objects from the Caribbean, West Africa, South America and Europe to ask questions about its own involvement with the transatlantic slave trade – and, in doing so, to interrogate wider histories of human exploitation (8 September–7 January 2024). The exhibition opens with a critical look at Richard Fitzwilliam, after whom the museum is named.

READ MORE HERE

Free Thinking: Black Atlantic

 

September 19th, 2023 | BBC Sounds

In 1816, Richard Fitzwilliam donated money, literature and art to the University of Cambridge, and the museum which bears his name began. A research project led by New Generation Thinker Jake Subryan Richards has been exploring Cambridge’s role in the transatlantic slave trade and he has curated an exhibition at the Fitzwilliam. Artist and writer Jacqueline Bishop who features in this show, joins Jake and April-Louise Pennant, who has been researching the history of Penrhyn Castle in Wales. Plus, Sherry Davis discusses the rediscovery of Black professionals in East African archaeology.

Producer: Ruth Watts

LISTEN TO THE FULL EPISODE HERE

VIDEOS

Jacqueline Bishop: The Market Woman Story

Jacqueline Bishop: The Market Woman Story

The Market Woman Story
edition of 3
2023
digital print on commercial porcelain
various dimensions

Now part of the permanent collection at the Williams College Museum of Art

THE MARKET WOMAN STORY

Limited edition set | Edition of 3

RECENTLY ON VIEW

OUR AMERICA/WHOSE AMERICA?


Ferrin Contemporary | North Adams, MA | August 6 – October 30, 2022

ABOUT The Market Woman Story


More on Jacqueline Bishop HERE

As a little girl growing up on the island of Jamaica, Jacqueline Bishop’s grandmother had a large mahogany cabinet where she kept some of her most prized possessions: her bone china crockery. These delicate pieces were painted with bright, cheerful images of palaces and carriages and were only used on special occasions.

As beautiful as these china dishes were, they often hid a violent history of slavery and colonialism by European countries. In ‘History at the Dinner Table’, Jacqueline changes the story by showing the legacy of slavery on the dishes instead. Despite their violent history, Bishop is also seduced and charmed by the delicacy and beauty of bone chinaware and she has sought to produce dishes equally as beautiful as the ones made by major European centers of bone china production. The work is exhibited in mahogany cabinets as mahogany was once a major luxury import from Jamaica to England.

STATEMENT


ON “THE MARKET WOMAN STORY”

On one hand, the market woman/huckster is the most ubiquitous figure to emerge from plantation Jamaica. Yet, as pervasive as the figure of the market woman is in Jamaican and Caribbean art and visual culture, she remains critically overlooked.

In this set of fifteen dishes, I am both paying homage to the market woman – centering her importance to Caribbean society from the period of slavery onwards – placing her within a critical context. In particular, I place the market woman within a long tradition of female labor depicted in diverse imagery that I have sourced online, including early Jamaican postcards, paintings of enslaved women from Brazil, the colonial paintings of the Italian Agostino Brunias, and present-day photographs, which I collage alongside floral and abolitionist imagery.

I work in ceramics because all the women around me as I grew up – my mother, my grandmother, my great-grandmother – cherished ceramic dinner plates. These were centerpieces kept in one of their most important acquisitions, a specially made mahogany cabinet. To fabricate the plates, it is important that I am working with Emma Price, a British ceramicist based in Stoke-on-Trent in the former Spode factories. In the realization of the series, that connection imbues them with a meaning that shows the long and enduring relationship between England and Jamaica.

My hope in doing this work is to give much respect to the market women of the Jamaican and larger Atlantic world who have fed, and continue to feed, nations. The market woman is the defining symbol of Jamaica and Caribbean societies.

Jacqueline Bishop

NEWS

JACQUELINE BISHOP: The Market Woman’s Story Catalog with Video

August 23, 2022 | Published by British Art Studies

Jacqueline Bishop explains her process and approach to her series of 15 plates depicting collages of Jamaican market women throughout history.

View The Market Women’s Story on British Art Studies.