Leslie Ferrin

NATURE OF NURTURING | Notes from Director, Leslie Ferrin

NATURE OF NURTURING | Notes from Director Leslie Ferrin

A renewed awareness and galvanizing commitment for change is surging through American cultural and academic institutions, organizations, and businesses of every sort, exposing the crying need for structural change. Specifically, this includes the advancement of equality for artists of all genders, eliminating the sexual harassment, wage discrimination, and the other forms of sexism that continue to affect the lives of women, transgender and non-binary individuals. As part of the movement to reverse and rebalance priorities as well as open new doors, it is crucial to offer opportunities to artists who have been historically marginalized.

Ferrin Contemporary has invited twelve female artists to pause and reflect on the role gender plays in their artistic practice, to consider the impact of the #MeToo movement, and/or to examine how the constructs of gender and gendered behavior impact their personal and professional lives. Nature assigned these artists who identify as female on a given path, whereas nurture is an accumulation of experiences and influences has had both positive and negative impact on their personal and professional lives.

Individual artworks do not always offer specific references to identity through direct content. However, a close look at the career paths in the short biographies and written statements in this exhibition, Nature/Nurture reveals information about how each of these artists – members of several different generations – has sustained her creative practice. The ceramic artworks in Nature/Nurture converge in a dialogue and accumulation of experiences and influences; they reflect on positive and negative forces shaping contemporary female and non-binary identities. Together, through the artwork, statements and biographies, these women artists who identify as female and are at various stages of their careers, convey different experiences defined by their gender, age, geographic and cultural identities.

Mara Superior, Sally Silberberg, Tricia Zimic have had decades-long careers that began before the two youngest, now in their 30’s were born. Unlike the women who began their career in the 70’s, Crystal Morey and Lauren Mabry and others born in the 80’s are already well established with museums actively acquiring important mid-career works. Linda Sikora and Linda Sormin have balanced their international artistic practices with teaching in University programs. As a graduate student, Linda Sikora was unable to attend a program led by a female professor. Linda Sormin, of the generation following, pursued graduate studies specifically with three leading women artists Linda Sikora, Andrea Gill and Anne Currier. Likewise, Giselle Hicks and Cristina Córdova had the advantage of powerful female faculty and confidence that led to independent paths, establishing their own studio practice supported by periodic short term teaching, unhindered by the politics of full-time academia. International artists, Kadri Pärnamets (Estonia), Rae Stern (Israel) and Anina Major (Bahamas)

have located their practices in the USA where residencies have welcomed them, supported the development of their work and proximity to the marketplace.

For the two artists who began their careers in the 70’s, their education took place in institutions with male-dominated programs. As they began their careers, the studio craft movement provided independent economic security and a “workaround” for women whose chosen media, ceramics, had yet to be embraced by the fine art world. For those who followed beginning their careers in the 90’s and until the market crash in 2008, the glass ceiling showed cracks. Women were hired in academic positions, replacing retiring male faculty as programs were rebalanced to achieve diversity.

Starting in the eighties, studio craft was avidly collected by private collectors through fairs, galleries and directly from the artists themselves. The ultimate goal of self-support through sales was viable for a large number of artists but that ended with the recession. For those who began their professional careers at a time when the market system had collapsed, these artists were ultimately fortunate as a new path opened for work in ceramics when the groundbreaking survey exhibition in 2009, “Dirt on Delight” jettisoned ceramics into the broader field of contemporary fine art in the USA. In addition, the explosion of international biennales inclusive of ceramics and craft that provided context for material based artworks in the broader art scene.

This wide acceptance for ceramics and the other female associated media, fiber arts, has settled the Art vs. Craft debate. For both emerging and established artists whose chosen primary material was previously segregated and independent from the mainstream, these new opportunities for their works have begun to balance the gender and cultural gap of representation at galleries and museums. Foundation support for diversity initiatives have had a significant impact through awards for artist fellowships and new scholarship. For those whose work took the form of vessels or studio pottery, a new generation of curators have embraced their work by making connections between practicing contemporary artists and past masterworks in the areas of decorative arts and design.

Inspired by the important work of Judith Butler and Helen Longino, the artists in this show were invited to explore the influence of ‘Nature/Nurture’ within their practice. Their work ranges from more direct interpretations of the natural world, to more abstract notions, such as the construction of gender, and endowed role of women.  “Possibility is not a luxury; it is as crucial as bread.” ― Judith Butler, Undoing Gender, 2004

Seen as a whole, this group of twelve women artists who live and work throughout the USA, is representative of the rising tide of professional opportunities. While significant earnings and advancement gaps remain, a course correction is underway through the increasing number of gender and culturally specific exhibitions. As priorities shift for museum collections, educational public programming and private collectors, these efforts to course-correct are bringing recognition to artists previously overlooked and undervalued and to undocumented legacies. Nature/Nurture seeks to contribute to and further this recognition.

Leslie Ferrin, director Ferrin Contemporary

NATURE/NURTURE
a group exhibition of twelve contemporary female artists invited to explore the influence of gender and its impact on their practice.

Read the NATURE/NURTURE series

NATURE/NURTURE | Group Show of 12 Women Artists
LESLIE FERRIN | Director Notes | Nature of Nurturing
CRISTINA CORDOVA | Nature/Nurture | PBS Craft in America – Identity
LAUREN MABRY | Nature/Nurture | Cylinders & Flow Blocks
ANINA MAJOR | Nature/Nurture | No Vacancy in Paradise
CRYSTAL MOREY | Nature/Nurture | Museum Acquisitions
KADRI PÄRNAMETS | Nature/Nurture | Small Matters and Roots & Pollinators

MARA SUPERIOR | Nature/Nurture | Museum Acquisitions
RAE STERN | Nature/Nurture | In Fugue
TRICIA ZIMIC | Nature/Nurture | Sins & Virtues

READ MORE HERE.

MORE ON THE ARTISTS

*ADDITIONAL ARTIST PROFILES BEING COMPOSED AS THE SERIES UNFOLDS*
CHECK BACK FOR MORE ON:

Giselle Hicks
Kadri Pärnamets
Sally Silberberg
Linda Sikora
Linda Sormin

Posted by AxelJ in Blog, News, NOTES FROM DIRECTOR

LIFE IN THE TIME OF COVID | BERKSHIRE UPDATE | Stories from the World of MASS MoCA

LIFE IN TIME OF COVID
Stories from the World of MASS MoCA


Here in our beloved Berkshires … the museums are closed, performances are canceled and our friends in hospitality don’t know when they can safely welcome visitors again. The people who live and work here are furloughed, their jobs in limbo and exhibitions closed. With performances canceled and galleries closed, MASS MoCA announced 120 layoffs on April 11. Remaining staff salaries had to be cut and plans for reopening remains unknown. Many who work in the creative economy are artists who blend their studio practice with part-time work in the museums, or as educators, freelancers, or jobs in hospitality. While we await the government relief programs for individuals, cultural institutions and small businesses, we hear stories from those who work in the creative economy about coping, adjusting and trying to make ends meet.

We are devoting this newsletter to them, the people we work within the World of MASS MoCA and hope you can offer a little support during these challenging times.

Every little bit helps.

TIP JAR
MUSEUM MEMBERSHIPS
HOTEL CERTIFICATES
EAT & DRINK LOCAL
SHOP FOR ART ONLINE

FERRIN CONTEMPORARY is located in Building 13 on the MASS MoCA campus. The gallery is closed until the museum reopens. Our featured artist Evan Hauser is on view at The Porches Inn also closed.

Take a virtual tour of NATURE/NURTURE at Ferrin Contemporary
Evan Hauser at The Porches Inn and our touring exhibitions throughout the country.

Life in the Time of Covid
read the series in director notes
HERE

Be Safe – Be Well – Stay in Touch

Leslie Ferrin, director Ferrin Contemporary

Posted by AxelJ in Blog, NOTES FROM DIRECTOR
LIFE IN THE TIME OF COVID | Notes from Director, Leslie Ferrin

LIFE IN THE TIME OF COVID | Notes from Director, Leslie Ferrin

LIFE IN THE TIME OF COVID | Leslie Ferrin, director

 

 

We are thinking of you, our artists, colleagues and friends.

Wherever you are, and hopefully safe, we are all experiencing the new reality of living in a profoundly changed world. We’ve been hearing of so many challenges in day to day life, fear of exposure, loss of employment, constant worrying for loved ones and managing varying degrees of long term isolation.

Last week, our third in quarantine, our particular struggle was complicated by a surge in internet demand within our small, rural community that is still without broadband service and suffers from chronic, spotty cell service. Due to social isolation, we must now use the internet for everything we do, to work, to make purchases, to stay connected with distant family, and to provide access to online school for our youngest resident, Roosi Isupov. We live in rural America where we can take daily walks and never see another soul. We feel fortunate to be where we are and continue what we do given the limitations of remote work. Our inconveniences pale when we connect with those in urban hot spots who are living densely, surrounded by incessant 24/7 wailing sirens and alone. Together we will get through this with you and our artists who are resilient, determined, creative. We will remain connected to one another through our shared support of art, culture and empathy for one another.

Now that we are past the initial shock of closures, exhibition postponements and cancellations, we are doing what we can to keep our team and artists working. With any luck, SBA payroll relief will ease the way and allow us to maintain and expand communications with regular news and stories about contemporary ceramic art. Using all the available online skills and tools in our toolbox, we are committed to staying connected with you and sharing stories about our artists, their exhibitions, our museum colleagues, our gallery partners and our community in the Berkshires. Through our mutual interest in ceramics, we find ourselves interconnected, in the studio, in our homes, and in making and seeing beauty in little things; and empathy abounds.

Artists by nature, work in isolation and have the skills to meet the challenges of social distancing. We are hearing amazing stories from our artists who are using their skills to sew, fix, repair, plant and shape the world around them. Through Instagram, we see their works in progress as they prepare for future shows.

Collectors are using this time to take on long term, large scale organizing, digital documentation, considering gifts to museums, reading and learning about the artists whose works they own and finding room for a future purchase of long admired work of art. Our team of specialists are experts in working remotely and happy to help navigate the digital challenges.

Curators are finding new ways to share their knowledge digitally, through guided tours of closed exhibitions, inclusive online live classes like the ones Garth Johnson from the Everson Museum of Art and is doing where you get to go behind the scenes with colleagues and snoop around the shelves with Jeffrey Spahn as he explained Asian influence on the work of American Studio Potters and a focus on Karen Karnes.

The slow down at Ferrin Contemporary and ProjectArt gives us time to pace the work we do. We are in the middle of the long procrastinated project of organizing the library and archives gathered over our 40 years of exhibitions. Starting with bookshelves, we ended up renovating the studio for future workshops and resident artists. We are planting a huge garden and finding ways to maintain friendships with those who live both near and far. All of us are cherishing what we have and what we can give to those in need.

This week’s news and stories continue our focus on the twelve women artists in NATURE/NURTURE with Crystal Morey. We congratulate her and Shane for their first baby girl, Isla born in January and know that it has given her a new perspective on the role of nurturing and a welcome distraction from the outside world.

The NATURE/NURTURE series
NATURE/NURTURE | Group Show of 12 Women Artists
LESLIE FERRIN | Director Notes | Nature of Nurturing
CRISTINA CORDOVA | Nature/Nurture | PBS Craft in America – Identity
LAUREN MABRY | Nature/Nurture | Cylinders & Flow Blocks
ANINA MAJOR | Nature/Nurture | No Vacancy in Paradise
CRYSTAL MOREY | Nature/Nurture | Museum Acquisitions
ANINA MAJOR | Nature/Nurture | No Vacancy In Paradise
MARA SUPERIOR | Nature/Nurture | Museum Acquisitions

READ MORE HERE.

Be Safe – Be Well – Stay in Touch

Leslie Ferrin, director Ferrin Contemporary

Posted by AxelJ in Blog, News, NOTES FROM DIRECTOR

SOUVENIR OF SELMA | PAUL SCOTT | New American Scenery

SOUVENIR OF SELMA | PAUL SCOTT | New American Scenery | MLK | Notes from director, Leslie Ferrin

“Let us march on ballot boxes until the salient misdeeds of bloodthirsty mobs will be transformed into the calculated good deeds of orderly citizens.”
Martin Luther King, March 25, 1965, Montgomery, Alabama

In honor of Martin Luther King Day, we are sharing Paul Scott‘s “Souvenir of Selma” currently on view at RISD Museum in Providence, RI. The piece is featured in New American Scenery, presented in the newly renovated porcelain room as one of the solo exhibitions in the museum-wide exhibition, “Raid the Icebox Now”.

The central image on the plate was taken on 7 March 2018, when Paul took part in a commemorative march in Selma, Alabama. The annual event commemorates 1965’s ‘Bloody Sunday’ when a group of 525 unarmed civil rights protesters met to promote black voter registration and to protest the killing of Jimmie Lee Jackson by a state trooper during a February voter registration march in a nearby city. As the group, including children, marched peacefully across the Edmund Pettus Bridge, they were met with unprovoked brutality as State Troopers, Sheriff’s deputies and a horse-mounted posse attacked, gassed and beat them. Media coverage of the event shocked the world and ultimately led to the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
Paul’s plate is a bittersweet ‘souvenir’, though. While the front images act to commemorate the ultimately positive outcomes of the original march, he qualifies it, using a quote by acclaimed photo-journalist Chris Arnade, who asserts that although undoubtedly a symbol of past civil rights victories, Selma’s current state also demonstrates ongoing civil rights failures.

Looking deeper on this day that honors King’s legacy, his speech from over 50 years ago reminds us of what issues remain and the importance of the ballot in this election year.

“Yes, we are on the move and no wave of racism can stop us. (Yes, sir) We are on the move now. The burning of our churches will not deter us. (Yes, sir) The bombing of our homes will not dissuade us. (Yes, sir) We are on the move now. (Yes, sir) The beating and killing of our clergymen and young people will not divert us. We are on the move now. (Yes, sir) The wanton release of their known murderers would not discourage us. We are on the move now. (Yes, sir) Like an idea whose time has come, (Yes, sir) not even the marching of mighty armies can halt us. (Yes, sir) We are moving to the land of freedom. (Yes, sir) … Let us march on ballot boxes, (Let’s march) march on ballot boxes until race-baiters disappear from the political arena.

Let us march on ballot boxes until the salient misdeeds of bloodthirsty mobs (Yes, sir) will be transformed into the calculated good deeds of orderly citizens. (Speak, Doctor)

Let us march on ballot boxes (Let us march) until the Wallaces of our nation tremble away in silence.

Let us march on ballot boxes (Let us march) until we send to our city councils (Yes, sir), state legislatures, (Yes, sir) and the United States Congress, (Yes, sir) men who will not fear to do justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with thy God.

Let us march on ballot boxes (Let us march. March) until brotherhood becomes more than a meaningless word in an opening prayer, but the order of the day on every legislative agenda.

Let us march on ballot boxes (Yes) until all over Alabama God’s children will be able to walk the earth in decency and honor.”

 

Click HERE  to hear Martin Luther King’s speech in Montgomery, March 25, 1965.

Scott’s Cumbrian Blue(s), New American Scenery, Souvenir of Selma, AL. In-glaze screen print (decal) on salvaged Syracuse China with pearlware glaze, 30cm dia. Paul Scott 2019.

 

 

PAUL SCOTT: New American Scenery

 

New American Scenery  juxtaposes early 19th-century Staffordshire ceramic transferwares drawn from the shelves of the RISD Museum storage with new artworks by Paul Scott, Cumbrian Blue(s). Replacing the porcelain works typically on view in the newly renovated Lucy Truman Aldrich gallery, New American Scenery melds historic printed tablewares, altered antique ceramics, and reclaimed Syracuse China plates with new screenprints updating early transferware subjects for the 21st century.

New American Scenery is first presented in Raid The Icebox Now at RISD Museum, Providence RI from September 13, 2019- September 6, 2020.

New American Scenery will be presented in an expanded exhibition at Albany Institute of Art & History, Albany, NY from September 16, 2020- January 3, 2021.

RISD Museum, Providence, RI
in Raid The Icebox Now
on view through September 6, 2020.

Click HERE for more.

ClickHERE to inquire.

 

Photographs of Artwork by John Polak; Interior photography by Erik Gould

 

ABOUT PAUL SCOTT

 

Paul Scott is an English artist who lives and works in Cumbria, UK. He appropriates traditional blue and white transferwares to make contemporary artwork for 21st-century audiences. At the same time, he commemorates and celebrates a rich, complex historical genre that is inextricably linked to wider visual and political cultures. Alturas Foundation supported the creation of New American Scenery as part of its Artist In Residence program. Other funders included Arts Council EnglandFerrin Contemporary and RISD Museum.

 

Posted by AxelJ in Blog, NOTES FROM DIRECTOR
Leslie Ferrin, The Berkshire Eagle, May 17, 2019

Leslie Ferrin, The Berkshire Eagle, May 17, 2019

Shaping the exhibition I Ferrin Contemporary Director helps shape artists’ work, clients’ collections
by Jennifer Smith Huberdeau

Berkshire Eagle

May 17, 2019

“The theory was to run the business from the artist’s perspective; to do for artists what I wanted done for me as an artist and wasn’t finding for myself. I think a lot of galleries are run by people who used to be artists, so they have that perspective. It’s a really creative role to be the one who brings the [artist’s] work into the public. You have to understand the artist’s perspective and the public’s perspective and then bring those two things together.”…

READ MORE

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shaping the exhibition I Ferrin Contemporary Director helps shape artists’ work, clients’ collections
by Jennifer Smith Huberdeau, photo credit: Gillian Jones

Posted by Kim in Artist News, Blog, News, Press Coverage
NCECA PITTSBURGH

NCECA PITTSBURGH

REVIVE, REMIX, RESPOND
The Frick Pittsburgh
7227 Reynolds Street, Pittsburgh

Group show of contemporary artists who are breathing new life into the ceramic medium by reinvigorating age-old motifs, processes, and techniques. In 2017, artists were invited to respond to and produce new works that reference the art, objects, and social history of the collections.

Chris Antemann, Robin Best, Stephen Bowers,Bouke de Vries, Ed Eberle, Evan Hauser, Steven Young Lee, Beth Lipman, Crystal Morey, Kadri Pärnamets, Peter Pincus, Justin Rothshank, Paul Scott, Cindy Sherman, Kate Roberts, Caroline Slotte, Dirk StaschkeMara Superior,and Kurt Weiser.

Click here for more about the exhibition.

 photo: Kurt Weiser

CHRIS ANTEMANN

Go Figure
group show at The Clay Penn
511 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh

Revive, Remix, Respond
The Frick Pittsburgh
7227 Reynolds Street, Pittsburgh
Click here for more about the exhibition.

Click here for more and available works.

CRISTINA CÓRDOVA
Demonstrating Artist

at NCECA Conference
Convention Center Ballroom B
Thursday, March 15, 9am–12pm
Friday, March 16, 1–4pm

“I will demonstrate the construction of a large scale torso through the use of slabs. Utilizing proportional references the building strategy will involve developing individual elements that will later stack into a four- to five-foot-tall piece.” 

ONGOING:
CRISTINA CÓRDOVA: JUNGLA
solo exhibition at Alfred University Ceramic Art Museum, Alfred, NY

Click here for more and available works.

ED EBERLE

Revive, Remix, Respond
The Frick Pittsburgh
7227 Reynolds Street, Pittsburgh
Click here for more about the exhibition.

Onview at the Carnegie Museum of Art

Eberle Studios
229 East 9th Ave, Homestead, PA

Click here for more and available works.

KATE ROBERTS

Structures of Atmosphere
group show
7800 Susquehanna St (5th floor), PIttsburgh

Revive, Remix, Respond
The Frick Pittsburgh
7227 Reynolds Street, Pittsburgh
Click here for more about the exhibition.

JUSTIN ROTHSANK

Collaboration Companions
group show at Union Project
801 N. Negley Avenue, PIttsburgh

GrowlerFest
711 South 21st Street, Pittsburgh

Revive, Remix, Respond
The Frick Pittsburgh
7227 Reynolds Street, Pittsburgh
Click here for more about the exhibition.

Click here for link to available works.

JASON WALKER

Supermud / Futuremud
group show of Penn State alumni and faculty
Union Project
801 N. Negley Avenue, Pittsburgh
Click here for more about the exhibition.

Click here for more and available works.

GrowlerFest
at Brew House Association

group show curated by Alexandra Jelleberg and Brad Klem connecting contemporary ceramics and the thriving craft beer movement

RECEPTION: Friday, March 16, 6-10pm
711 South 21st Street, Pittsburgh

Click for more on Brew House Arts.
Click for tickets and more about Growlerfest.

NCECA National Council on Education in the Ceramic Arts, annual conference is in Pittsburgh, PA.  Each year the host city provides collectors and artists the opportunity to see regional museum collections, explore established and pop-up galleries and meet up with colleagues.  The exhibitions of ceramic sculpture and studio pottery are mounted throughout the city and provide an opportunity to survey current trends and discover young artists.

Click for link to exhibition guide.
Click for link to conference program.

Posted by AxelJ in Artist News, Events, News, Past events
ARTIST NEWS: SERGEI ISUPOV shows and workshops

ARTIST NEWS: SERGEI ISUPOV shows and workshops

FIGURE—GROUND:
Illustrated Sculpture Workshops with Sergei Isupov

TWO UPCOMING WORKSHOPS
April 8–14, 2018
and
September 23–29, 2018
both at Project Art, Cummington, MA

Join internationally acclaimed sculptor Sergei Isupov for a week-long intensive workshop exploring the sculpted form in clay, the painted surface, and development of a personal narrative.
Click for more.

ANIMAL KINGDOM

group show
March 7–April 21, 2018
opening reception: Saturday, March 10, 5–7pm
 
William Baczek Fine Arts
Northampton, MA

show features the work of 12 international artists and includes painting and sculpture

Click for more.
Click to view more work by Isupov.

DIRECTIONS

group show
May 5–July 22, 2018
Ferrin Contemporary
1315 MASS MoCA Way, North Adams, MA

SERGEI ISUPOV
artist reception & demonstration

Saturday, May 5, 3-5 pm
In conjunction with ArtWeek in Massachusetts
April 27–May 6, 2018

Click for more.
Click to view more work by Isupov.

WORKSHOP IN ESTONIA

July 14–18, 2018
Studio Asuurkeraamika
Tallinn, Estonia

Studio Asuurkeraamika is a ceramics centre located in a medieval tower that once guarded Tallinn’s Old Town. There are five floors with studio, classroom, exhibition place, and gallery. All are linked by spiraling limestone staircases.

Information and registration form are available  on Project Art’s website. Click for more.

Sergei Isupov is represented by Ferrin Contemporary. Click to view work.

Posted by AxelJ in Artist News, Events, News
New York Ceramics & Glass Fair 2018

New York Ceramics & Glass Fair 2018

Ferrin Contemporary at the
NEW YORK CERAMICS & GLASS FAIR 2018
Jan 18–21, 2018

Kurt Weiser, “Random House (globe)” 2017, porcelain, glaze, china paint, metal, 30 x 14 x 14″.

Chris Antemann

SPECIAL EXHIBITION
“Revive, Remix, Respond: Contemporary Ceramic Artists
at The NYC&GF and The Frick Pittsburgh”

Organized by Dawn Reid Brean, Associate Curator of Decorative Arts
at The Frick Pittsburgh, and Leslie Ferrin, Director of Ferrin Contemporary.

20 contemporary artists respond to and produce new works
that reference the art, objects and social history of the The Frick’s collections.
Full exhibition at The Frick Pittsburgh:
February 16–May 27, 2018.

LECTURE
“Revive, Remix, Respond:
Contemporary Ceramic Artists at The Frick Pittsburgh”

with Dawn Brean and attending artists
Friday, January 19, 2–3 pm
Click for more.

LOCATION

Bohemian National Hall
(Between 2nd and 3rd Avenues)
321 East 73rd Street
New York, NY 10021

SHOW HOURS
Preview

Wed, January 17th | 5–8:30pm

General Admission
Thu–Sat | 11am–7pm
Sun | 11am–4pm
No Admittance Sunday after 3:30pm

Posted by AxelJ in Blog, 0 comments
ARTIST NEWS: SERGEI ISUPOV  |  Fire Sculpture, Workshop, Exhibitions

ARTIST NEWS: SERGEI ISUPOV | Fire Sculpture, Workshop, Exhibitions

SELECTIONS FROM
HIDDEN MESSAGES 


Highlights from Sergei Isupov: Hidden Messages,  originally shown at Erie Art Museum, are now on view at Ferrin Contemporary, 1315 MASS MoCA Way, North Adams, MA. The exhibit includes one of Isupov’s larger-than-life figural sculptures with smaller works blown across a full wall of wind and shadows. Hidden Messages is available for exhibition at other galleries and museums.
Click to view more.
Click to inquire.

FIGURE—GROUND WORKSHOP


Illustrated Sculpture Workshop with Sergei Isupov
September 17–23, 2017
at Project Art, Cummington, MA
This week-long intensive workshop explores the sculpted form in clay, the painted surface, and development of a personal narrative. The workshop will combine hands-on demonstrations, one-on-one instruction, and lectures.
Click for more.
Click to register.


This towering sculpture was produced by Isupov in honor of the 20th anniversary of the Guldagergaard International Ceramic Research Center in Skælskør, Denmark, in July 2017.
Image courtesy Pricilla Mouritzen.
Click for more.


This group exhibition was produced during artist residencies at Guldagergaard International Ceramic Research Center in Denmark.
Presented at
Guldagergaard, Skælskør, Denmark
September 30—October 30, 2016
and at Officinesaffi, Milan, Italy
June 22–July 14, 2017
Click for more.
Click to view article in Architectural Digest.

SMALL WORKS BY SERGEI ISUPOV


Mugs, brooches, and other small objects are available through Ferrin Contemporary’s online shop.
Click for more.

Posted by AxelJ in Artist News, Blog, Events, News, Past events
Cristina Córdova: Involuntary Dialogs in Ceramics Monthly

Cristina Córdova: Involuntary Dialogs in Ceramics Monthly

Cristina Córdova: Involuntary Dialogs

Ceramics Monthly, Feb 2016
by Kathleen Whitney

“For centuries, both painting and sculpture were synonymous with the representation of figures; the earliest images we know are figurative. The foundation of Cristina Córdova’s work lies squarely within this global tradition.”

Click here to read full article.

Posted by REBECCA WEINMAN in Artist News, News, Press Coverage